Our Story

Hello and thank you for visiting Oasis Place!

Our story began in 2010 when our son, Joshua, was only one-and-a-half years old. Our friend, a pediatric neurologist, noticed that Joshua displayed some signs of autism including limited eye contact, speech delay and hyperactivity. In hindsight, we can vividly remember times when Joshua would spin around intensely to music and not respond to his name. We immediately began the search for assessment and diagnosis, and quickly encountered frustratingly long waits in both public and private centres. After 5 long months of waiting, Joshua was finally seen at KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital in Singapore and diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-NOS; a group of conditions that involve delays in the development of many basic skills. And from that day on, our journey to heal our son began….

Armed with blood test reports of high mercury toxicity, a long list of allergens and other biomedical imbalances, we travelled the globe searching for the best help. In May 2010, we attended a “Defeat Autism Now” conference in the United States. We spoke to countless doctors, specialists and other parents of autistic children and soon realised we were not alone. We knew it would not be a smooth journey ahead, but we felt comforted and empowered by our new-found knowledge. We left the US with hope and determination.

On our return to Kuala Lumpur, we began a rigorous routine of nutritional therapy with a gluten and casein-free diet and bio-medical supplementation. Together with sensory integration occupational therapy and speech therapy, Joshua made great progress. We also used “Relationship Development Intervention Therapy” which provided the dynamic elements of intervention. It was not long before it was clear that multi-disciplinary intervention was the key. Three years of travel for intensive intervention was physically and mentally exhausting, however, with regular appointments and the support of family and friends, we were blessed with the fruits of our labour.

 
  • Dr Ng Sui Yin, Consultant Paediatric Neurologist, Gleneagles Hospital Kuala Lumpur

    I am glad with early diagnosis and the enthusiasm of the parents to introduce the recommended multidisciplinary therapeutic modalities, Joshua is now grown up to be a charming and engaging teenager. May the parents channel their experience to true blessings for others that are similarly afflicted.

    Dr Ng Sui Yin, Consultant Paediatric Neurologist, Gleneagles Hospital Kuala Lumpur
  • Dr Susan M.K.Tan, Consultant Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist, Park City Medical Centre & Thomson Hospital Kota, Damansara
    Oasis Place, embodies the vision of its founders in bringing world class services to your child in Malaysia - just as they would have wished was available for their own son, Joshua, 10 years ago.
    Dr Susan M.K.Tan, Consultant Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist, Park City Medical Centre & Thomson Hospital Kota, Damansara

Within one year, Joshua blossomed into an interactive, engaged and happy boy. By the age of 5, his receptive and expressive language were above the 99th percentile of the Preschool Language Scales (PLS-5) assessment. Joshua’s autism became practically unnoticeable to the untrained eye.

We believe one of the main reasons for Joshua’s success was being able to integrate his intervention therapy into his regular school day at the inclusive Montessori school he attended. Having some medical training under our belt, we could simplify some therapies and train the school's learning support and class teachers to integrate them throughout the day. With support from the school principal and his caring teachers, every lesson at the supportive and inclusive schooling environment became a therapeutic opportunity.

At the age of 7, when Joshua transitioned to elementary school, armed with a transition psycho-educational, speech and occupational therapy assessments, we consulted a developmental paediatrician to re-evaluate his learning support needs. We were amazed to discover his new diagnosis as “a dual exceptional category” with some social communication challenges.